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Military History Requirement

Courses that satisfy the Military History Requirement
1. IAW TRADOC Regulation 350-13, Para 3-3, the Professor of Military Science of UNC-Charlotte has approved the following courses as satisfying the pre-commissioning military history requirement.  
 
See Military History Requirement signed memorandum for list of Professor of Military Science approved military history courses.
 
UNC-Charlotte
HIST 2120 – American Military History -- A survey of the development and organization of military practice from the colonial period to the present. (Spring)
 
HIST 2284 – WWII: The European Theater -- Major campaigns of World War II with emphasis upon the European theater of operations. (Alternate Years)
 
HIST 2285 – WWII: The Pacific Theater -- A description and analytical survey of the military campaigns in the Pacific theater of operations. (Alternate Years)
 
HIST 3141 – World War I -- World War I from the outbreak of hostilities to the peace settlement. Impact on the combatant nations and subsequent development of the World. (Yearly)
 
HIST 3202 – The American Revolution, 1750-1815 -- The American Revolution was both a military conflict fought over the issue of colonial independence and a catalyst for sweeping political and social change.  This course examines the Revolution as a political, social, and military phenomenon, focusing on the transformation of political culture and the experiences of ordinary Americans. (Spring)
 
HIST 3211 – Civil War and Reconstruction -- The American people in war and the postwar adjustment. Emphasis on the political, social and economic conditions of the North and South during the Civil War and Reconstruction period.
 
LBST 2102 series courses:
Global Connections (HIST) (X) - 22104 - LBST 2102 – 201
Children in War and Conflict: This course investigates the global (mis)use of children in modern war and conflict. Participants compare and contrast the causes, events, and effects of war on child perpetrators, victims, and bystanders to come to better understanding of both the historical roots and evolution of contemporary war, and its impact on their contemporaneous peers. Case studies cover global conflicts as well as those particular to Europe, Asia, Africa, (Latin)America, and the Middle East. LBST 2102 may not be repeated for credit.
 
Global Connections (HIST) (X) - 22086 - LBST 2102 - 200
World War One as Global War: World War One is the most important military conflict of the twentieth century. Indeed, this war determined the course of
European and world history in the twentieth century in ways often misunderstood by Americans, many of whom consider the Second World War more essential.  Yet, World War One shattered the century old balance of power Metternich established in 1815 at the Congress of Vienna. The consequences of this war set the stage for communism, fascism, modern liberalism, labor, World War Two, the Cold War, American international preeminence, de-colonization, the United Nations, and even the European Union. This course is an introduction to World War One from the comparative global perspective; not just the military aspect but an examination of the causes, course, conclusion, and legacy. Still called by many "the Great War," it was, others hoped, to be the "war to end all wars." LBST may not be repeated for credit.
 
Global Connections (HIST) (X) - 23552 - LBST 2102 - 204
War in the Global Era: This course will focus on the evolution of warfare in the twentieth century. We will cover the three major conflicts of the century, the Great War, World War II, and the Cold War. In every case, we will examine the causes and effects of the conflict, as well as look at the global ramifications of each. We will dedicate significant amounts of time to the evolution of technology and the reasons why the various conflicts began - spending less time on the actual fighting of the wars. The class acts a survey and introduction to these conflicts and requires no previous knowledge. Lbst 2102 cannot be repeated for credit.
 
Global Connections (HIST) (X) - 23553 - LBST 2102 - 205
World War Two In The Pacific: A Clash Of Cultures. This course will consider the intercultural aspects of World War Two In The Pacific, focusing especially upon the clash between Western Culture, especially that of the United States, and Japanese Culture. Emphasis will be placed on the development and use of the atomic bomb upon Japanese cities by the U.S., the refusal of Japan to accept unconditional surrender, the commitment of Japan to the development of biological weapons through the auspices of Unit 731, the exploitation of women, primarily Korean, as sex slaves for Japanese troops, and the attitudes of both cultures to the prospect of individual and collective defeat
 
UCOL 1205 – War, Genocide, Human Rights Practicum – Hands on exploration of issues pertaining to War, Genocide, and Human Rights. Includes role of military and peace, meetings with experts and eyewitnesses, human rights project, field Trips, study help, career exploration.
 
Davidson College
HIS 252 – The United States from 1900 to 1945 -- An examination of United States history and controversies about it during the first half of the 20th century.  Topics include the Progressive Era, the “Roaring Twenties,” the Great Depression, and the two world wars.

HIS 253 – The United States since 1945 -- An examination of United States history and controversies about it from World War II to the present. Topics include the Cold War, the upheavals of the 1960s, the “New Right,” and the War on Terror.

HIS 341 - The Era of the American Revolution - The colonial movement from resistance to revolution; early republican thought and the adoption of state constitutions; the War for Independence; political and socioeconomic struggles of the Confederation period; the origins of the federal Constitution; and the Revolution's social impact.

HIS 346 – Civil War and Reconstruction -- Origins of sectional conflict; the battle front and home front, military, political, and social transformations of the war years; the upheavals of the Reconstruction era; and the legacies of the era for modern America.

HIS 349 – The Vietnam Experience -- America’s involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1975. Examines diplomatic, military, political, social, and domestic aspects of American intervention.

HIS 354 – US Foreign Policy since 1939 -- American foreign relations during a period of global political, economic, and military leadership. Topics include World War II, Cold War and detente, Vietnam War, and relations with the Third World.

CIS 236- Ethics and Warfare – The course examines theories about why human beings engage in mass killings, the history of moral deliberation about war in major philosophical and religious traditions, and modern analyses of the diverse and sometimes conflicting moral principles that those traditions have bequeathed to us. Students will develop an appreciation for the richness of ethical thinking about war, and enhance their skills in applying moral philosophical reasoning to contemporary wars.

POL 461 - Grand Strategy -- This seminar introduces students to the age-old and comtemporary aspects of the canon of grand strategy.  In addition to studying various books and films on warfare and strategy, students will participate in simulations and study grand strategy first hand (i.e. role playing of Revolutionary War military figures) during field trips to Kings Mountain National Battlefield and (fully optional) Colombia. 

Gardner-Webb University
HIST 318 – Civil War and Reconstruction -- The purpose of this course is to          study and analyze the causes and events of the American Civil War and its consequences.
 
HIST 383 – The Second World War -- This course is designed to allow interested students to gain a deeper understanding of the Second World War. It takes a global perspective in addressing the full origins, course and impacts of the war as a whole. This necessitates grasping the interrelatedness of the European, Mediterranean, Asian and Pacific Theaters. In addition to gaining a better understanding of the historical content, students should also further develop their research, analytical and communications skills and develop a broader view of how specific events fit into their proper historical context.
 
Belmont-Abbey College
HI 315 – Civil War and Reconstruction – This course investigates the revolutionary upheavals from 1850-1877 that reshaped and almost destroyed the United States.
 
Johnson C. Smith University
HIS 136 - History of the United States since 1865 – A study of the United States from the conclusion of the Civil War to the present
 
HIS 333 - The Diplomatic History of United States – A study of the foreign policy of the United States government. Emphasis is on wars, crises, territorial expansion, peculiarities of the American position in world politics, and the formation of basic policy decisions.
 
Catawba Valley Community College
HIS 145 – The Second World War – This course covers the period of the Second World War from 1919 to 1945. Topics include the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of totalitarian regimes, the origins of the war, the major military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific, and the aftermath. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, military, socioeconomic, and cultural developments that influenced the Second World War.

HIS 226 – The Civil War – This course examines the social, political, economic, and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts and sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns, and the War’s socioeconomic impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War.

Central Piedmont Community College
HIS 226 – The Civil War – This course examines the social, political, economic and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts and sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns and the war’s socioeconomic impact, aftermath and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War.
 
Cleveland Community College
HIS 226 – The Civil War – This course examines the social, political, economic, and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts, sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns, and the War’s socioeconomic impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War.
 
Mitchell Community College
HIS 226 – The Civil War – This course examines the social, political, economic, and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts and sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns, and the War’s socioeconomic impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War.
 
Pfeiffer University
HSTY 405 – United States 1850-1877 – Civil War and Reconstruction – The causes and consequences of the abortive “Southern War for Independence”; social, economic, and political developments in the disunited states during and after the war; problems of racial adjustment; constitutional and political change during the postwar era of Reconstruction. A research project is required.
 
Queens College
HIST 349 – Civil War and Reconstruction – The Civil War and Reconstruction: The Civil War and Reconstruction were the defining events of the nineteenth century if not the defining events in our nation's short history. Undertaking exactly how the nation arrived at the brink of war, divided, and finally, after horrible and bloody conflict, came back together again, will be the central task of this course. The course will be divided into three sections. In the first, students will explore the origins of the sectional conflict. Next students will examine the war itself, asking questions about the inevitability of the Union's victory and the role of the African Americans in the process of emancipation. In the last section of the course the class will study attempts to reconstruct the relationships between whites and blacks, northerners and southerners in the wake of the Confederacy's defeat. Attention will also be paid to popular, current interpretations of the causes and meanings of the Civil War in popular culture
 
Winthrop University
HIST 315 – Civil War and Reconstruction – A history of the coming of the American Civil War, the War itself and the ensuing Reconstruction period.
 
HIST 211-212 United States History to 1877- A survey of political, diplomatic, economic, social, intellectual and ethnic development through Reconstruction with attention to development of the Federal Constitution, Notes: offered in fall, spring and summer.
 
2. Other courses at the identified schools or other partner schools may fall under the guidance of TRADOC Regulation 350-13, and can be added at the discretion and approval of the PMS.
 
3. Courses are subject to change.

 

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Army ROTC, 49er Battalion
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jsloan24@uncc.edu
 
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