Military History Requirement

Courses that satisfy the Military Science Requirement

1.  IAW TRADOC Regulation 350-13, Para 3-3, the Professor of Military Science of UNC-Charlotte has approved the following courses as satisfying the pre-commissioning military history requirement.

2.  This memorandum will be used to document successful completion of the Military History course and staff ride requirements.  Additionally, the memorandum can be used to request consideration for approval of a new military history course.

UNC-Charlotte

HIST 2120 – American Military History -- A survey of the development and organization of military practice from the colonial period to the present. (Spring)

HIST 2284 – WWII: The European Theater -- Major campaigns of World War II with emphasis upon the European theater of operations.

HIST 2285 – WWII: The Pacific Theater -- A description and analytical survey of the military campaigns in the Pacific theater of operations.

HIST 3141 – World War I: World War I from the outbreak of hostilities to the peace settlement. Impact on the combatant nations and subsequent development of the World

HIST 3202 – The American Revolution, 1750-1815 -- The American Revolution was both a military conflict fought over the issue of colonial independence and a catalyst for sweeping political and social change.  This course examines the Revolution as a political, social, and military phenomenon, focusing on the transformation of political culture and the experiences of ordinary Americans.

HIST 3211 – Civil War and Reconstruction -- The American people in war and the postwar adjustment. Emphasis on the political, social and economic conditions of the North and South during the Civil War and Reconstruction period.

Davidson College

HIS 252 – The United States from 1900 to 1945 -- An examination of United States history and controversies about it during the first half of the 20th century.  Topics include the Progressive Era, the “Roaring Twenties,” the Great Depression, and the two world wars.

HIS 253 – The United States since 1945 -- An examination of United States history and controversies about it from World War II to the present. Topics include the Cold War, the upheavals of the 1960s, the “New Right,” and the War on Terror.

HIS 346 – Civil War and Reconstruction -- Origins of sectional conflict; the battle front and home front, military, political, and social transformations of the war years; the upheavals of the Reconstruction era; and the legacies of the era for modern America.

HIS 349 – The Vietnam Experience -- America’s involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1975. Examines diplomatic, military, political, social, and domestic aspects of American intervention.

HIS 354 – US Foreign Policy since 1939 -- American foreign relations during a period of global political, economic, and military leadership. Topics include World War II, Cold War and detente, Vietnam War, and relations with the Third World.

POL 461 – Grand Strategy. This seminar introduces students to the age-old and contemporary aspects of the canon of grand strategy. Students are expected to learn the various definitions and ideologies that comprise our understanding—or lack thereof—of grand strategy as well as the concept’s historical evolution since the late 19th century. Students will also learn to better master the craft of coherent and gripping analytical review essays that address a myriad of grand strategy topics. In addition, students will be exposed to the historical method and expected to apply it as they design, write, and orally present their research papers. Students will gain experience with oral presentations, as this is the final element of the semester-long research project. Students will also participate in simulations and study grand strategy first hand (e.g. role playing of Revolutionary War military figures) during field trips to Kings Mountain National Battlefield and (fully optional) Colombia.

Gardner-Webb University

HIST 330 – American Military History from 1776 to the Contemporary Operating Environment. Study of the threads of continuity throughout America’s military career with an emphasis on leadership, technology, doctrinal changes and the formation of today’s professional Army. Students are required to participate in a one- to two-day Staff Ride to a historic battlefield to demonstrate the usefulness of historical analysis to today’s military leader.

HIST 314 – Making America: Colonization, Revolution, and the U.S. Constitution. This course surveys the origins of American social and civic life in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Focusing primarily on British and French North America, topics include: the lives of native peoples, transatlantic migrations from Europe and Africa, regional variations across the Atlantic seaboard, origins of the crisis with Britain, the legacy of the American Revolution, the formation of the U.S. Constitution, and the presidential election of 1800.

HIST 318 – Civil War and Reconstruction -- The purpose of this course is to study and analyze the causes and events of the American Civil War and its consequences.

HIST 383 – The Second World War -- This course is designed to allow interested students to gain a deeper understanding of the Second World War. It takes a global perspective in addressing the full origins, course and impacts of the war as a whole. This necessitates grasping the interrelatedness of the European, Mediterranean, Asian and Pacific Theaters. In addition to gaining a better understanding of the historical content, students should also further develop their research, analytical and communications skills and develop a broader view of how specific events fit into their proper historical context.

Belmont-Abbey College

HIS 315 – Civil War and Reconstruction – This course investigates the revolutionary upheavals from 1850-1877 that reshaped and almost destroyed the United States.

Catawba College

HIST 3320 – American Civil War – A thorough and multifaceted examination of the causes, conflicts, and resolutions of the war and the Reconstruction period.

HIST 3500 – The Vietnam War – A study of the causes, course, and effects of the Vietnam War in the context of recent world and American history.

Catawba Valley Community College

HIS 145 – The Second World War – This course covers the period of the Second World War from 1919 to 1945. Topics include the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of totalitarian regimes, the origins of the war, the major military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific, and the aftermath. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, military, socioeconomic, and cultural developments that influenced the Second World War.

HIS 226 – The Civil War – This course examines the social, political, economic, and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts and sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns, and the War’s socioeconomic impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War.

Central Piedmont Community College

HIS 226 – The Civil War – This course examines the social, political, economic and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts and sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns and the war’s socioeconomic impact, aftermath and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War.

Cleveland Community College

HIS 226 – The Civil War – This course examines the social, political, economic, and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts, sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns, and the War’s socioeconomic impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War.

Mitchell Community College

HIS 226 – The Civil War – This course examines the social, political, economic, and ideological forces that led to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include regional conflicts and sectionalism, dissolution of the Union, military campaigns, and the War’s socioeconomic impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the United States during the era of the Civil War.

Pfeiffer University

HSTY 405 – United States 1850-1877 -- Civil War and Reconstruction – The causes and consequences of the abortive “Southern War for Independence”; social, economic, and political developments in the disunited states during and after the war; problems of racial adjustment; constitutional and political change during the postwar era of Reconstruction. A research project is required.

Queens College

HIST 349 – Civil War and Reconstruction – The Civil War and Reconstruction: The Civil War and Reconstruction were the defining events of the nineteenth century if not the defining events in our nation's short history. Undertaking exactly how the nation arrived at the brink of war, divided, and finally, after horrible and bloody conflict, came back together again, will be the central task of this course. The course will be divided into three sections. In the first, students will explore the origins of the sectional conflict. Next students will examine the war itself, asking questions about the inevitability of the Union's victory and the role of the African Americans in the process of emancipation. In the last section of the course the class will study attempts to reconstruct the relationships between whites and blacks, northerners and southerners in the wake of the Confederacy's defeat. Attention will also be paid to popular, current interpretations of the causes and meanings of the Civil War in popular culture

South Piedmont Community College

HIS 145 – The Second World War – This course covers the period of the Second World War from 1919 to 1945. Topics include the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of totalitarian regimes, the origins of the war, the major military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific, and the aftermath. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, military, socioeconomic, and cultural developments that influenced the Second World War.

USC Lancaster

HIS 404 – Civil War and Reconstruction – The political, military, and social history of the War and the reorganization which followed.

Winthrop University

HIST 315 – Civil War and Reconstruction – A history of the coming of the American Civil War, the War itself and the ensuing Reconstruction period.

2. Other courses at the identified schools or other partner schools may fall under the guidance of TRADOC Regulation 350-13, and can be added at the discretion and approval of the PMS.
 
3. Courses are subject to change.